Nelson
Mathematics 3
Student Centre

Teacher Centre
• Professional Resources
• Surf for More Math
• Try It Out
• Web Quests

Parent Centre

Nelson Education > School > Mathematics K-8 > Mathematics 3 > Teacher Centre > Web Quests > Chapter 5
 

Web Quests

CHAPTER 5

PAPER PLANE RACE

TASK

This Web Quest continues with the Fun Olympics theme of the Chapter 5 Chapter Task. Individually, students will choose and print an airplane design chosen from a group of Web sites. They will make their planes, name them and measure their length using an appropriate unit of measurement. In groups of 4, students will conduct a paper airplane race. For this part of the activity you will need a lot of space. They will be responsible for recording information about each plane and their flight distances. As a group, they will decide what unit of measurement they will use to measure flight distances and choose a winner. Each student will explain how he or she came to this decision in writing.

GOALS

  • choose the most appropriate unit of measurement to measure length
  • estimate, measure and record lengths

MEETING INDIVIDUAL NEEDS

  •  Some students may be comfortable creating their own charts, but many will prefer to use the provided chart.
  •  The race chart can be completed individually or in groups.
  •  Paper plane designs vary in difficulty. Encourage students to pick a design that matches their abilities.

INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS

  1. Tell students that they will be continuing their work on the Funny Olympics. Have students read the Introduction and Task sections of the Student page. Discuss how a paper plane race would be conducted and how they would decide the winner. Ask students if they can make a paper plane. Find out if they have any tips or tricks for flying them.
  2. Set students up at their computer stations. Tell students to look at 1 or 2 of the websites from the list. Have them choose a design for a paper plane. Encourage them to read the instructions before they make their decision. Have them print a copy of the instructions.
  3. Have students print a copy of the Paper Plane Race Chartbefore leaving their computer station.
  4. Supply students with the paper they will need to make their planes. As students are making their planes, circulate to ensure they are able to complete the task. Making paper planes takes patience and you need to follow the instructions carefully; some students may need assistance. You may want to help some students or have more experienced plane builders lend their expertise to their classmates.
  5. Once they have completed their planes, have students name and measure their planes. This information should also be recorded in their charts.
  6. Before students begin the race they should work together as a group to decide

    a) what unit of measurement they will use to measure the flight distances of their planes;
    b) what they will use to measure the distances;
    c) how they will decide the winner. Have them explain their thinking either orally or in writing.

  7. In their groups of 4, have students conduct their race.
  8. Have students declare a winner of the race. In writing, have them explain how they came to this decision.
  9. As a wrap-up to this race, have each group present their winning plane and the distance it flew. As a class, decide which plane flew the greatest distance.

RESOURCES

Websites:

Alex's Paper Airplanes
The Paper Airplane Hangar
Jline Paper Airplanes
Phoenix Sky Harbor Airplanes

Files:

Paper Plane Race Chart

Materials:

paper (planes)
printer paper
scissors
glue
30-cm ruler
metre stick
measuring tape (optional)
paper clips

ASSESSMENT

 

 

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 3

LEVEL 4

Understanding of Concepts

•  demonstrates a superficial or inaccurate understanding of the most appropriate unit to measure length

•  demonstrates a growing but still incomplete understanding of the most appropriate unit to measure length

•  demonstrates an appropriate understanding of the most appropriate unit to measure length

•  demonstrates an in-depth understanding of the most appropriate unit to measure length

Application of Procedures

•  makes major error/omissions when measuring and recording distances

 

•  makes several errors/omissions when measuring and recording distance

•  makes only a few minor   errors/omissions when measuring and recording distances

•  makes almost no errors/omissions when measuring and recording distances

Communication

 

 

•  provides an incomplete or inaccurate explanation of who won the race

•  uses a chart that exhibits minimal clarity and accuracy, and is ineffective in communicating race data

 

•  provides a partial explanation of who won the race

•  uses a chart that exhibits minimal clarity and accuracy, though not sufficient to impede communication of race data

•  provides a complete and clear explanation of who won the race

•  uses a chart that is sufficiently clear and accurate to communicate race data

•  provides a thorough and clear explanation of who won the race

•  uses a chart that is clear, precise and effective in communicating race data

Top