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Web Quests

CHAPTER 2

GAMES, GAMES, GAMES

INTRODUCTION

In Chapter 2 you have learned about place value. You played games such as Duelling Digits (Student Book, p 37) and Race for Two Toonies (Student Book, p 43) to help you practice your place value skills. Your teacher noticed that everyone liked playing the games and thought it would be a good idea if there were more place value games in the classroom for everyone to use.

THE TASK

Your teacher would like to have a lot of different types of games for students to practice place value skills. Work with a partner to design and make a fun game about the place value skills that you learned about in this chapter. The game can be a card game, a dice game, a board game or a guessing game.

THE PROCESS

  1. Research different types of place value games.

    a. With your partner, play at least 5 of the games found at the websites listed here:

    Place Value Game
    Place Values
    Thousands, Hundreds, Tens and Ones
    Place Value and Palindrome Riddles

    b. After you play each game, enter information into the All About Place Value Games sheet.
    c. Use the information on the All About Place Value Games sheet to decide what type of game your will design.

    "Which type did you both enjoy the most?"
    "How were the instructions written?"
    "Will it be possible to make a similar type of game?"
    "Could you combine the best parts of several games to make a new game?"

  2. Work with your partner to make your game.
    1. List the skills and the questions that will be asked in the game.
    2. Gather your equipment and supplies.
    3. Make a prototype of your game. This is a simple version of the game. If it is a board game, just draw it on plain paper at this time.
    4. Write the rule.
    5. Let some friends play your game and ask them what worked and what did not work.
    6. Use the feedback you got from your friends to make changes.
    7. Make the final version of your game.

RESOURCES

Websites:

Place Value Game
Place Values
Thousands, Hundreds, Tens and Ones
Place Value and Palindrome Riddles

Materials:

Blank playing cards
Construction paper
Coloured pencils or markers
Dice
Place value blocks

Files:

All About Place Value Games

ASSESSMENT

 

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Game Effectiveness

•  My game

asks some simple place value questions.

•  My game asks a few different types of place value questions.

•  My game asks many different types of place value questions.

•  My game asks many challenging and different types of place value questions.

Game Creativity

•  My game is the same as the games on the websites.

•  My game uses some attributes from the website to create a very simple game.

•  My game uses a variety of attributes in an interesting way.

•  My game uses a wide variety of attributes in a complex way.

Game Quality

•  My game has frequent place value errors, some major.

•  My game has a few place value errors, with no major errors.

•  My game has no place value errors.

•  My game has challenging place value questions and has no errors.

Communication

•  My game rules are somewhat unclear and it has some incorrect place value language.

•  My game rules are generally clear. I did not always use math language in the questions.

•  My game rules are clear. Place value language is correct.

•  My game rules are clear and I did not use too many words. Place value language used is always correct.

 

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